Effect of intervention practices to control the porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) outbreak during the first epidemic year (2013–2014) on time to absence of clinical signs and the number of dead piglets per sow in Japan

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Abstract

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is an emerging and/or re-emerging disease of pigs in several countries, with high morbidity and mortality in suckling piglets. Farms affected with PED perform various intervention practices to control and/or eliminate the PED virus. The objectives of the present study were to assess the effect of biosecurity measures and intervention practices to control PED on time to absence of clinical signs (TAC) and number of dead suckling piglets during TAC. A questionnaire was administered to 120-PED affected farms located across Japan between 2013, when the first case was reported in Japan, and 2014. Farms were asked to provide information on farm characteristics and internal or external biosecurity measures during PED outbreak, as well as on intervention practices to control PED. The TAC was defined as the number of days from the date that clinical PED signs appeared to the date that clinical PED signs disappeared. The number of dead piglets per sow (DP/S) was calculated as the number of dead suckling piglets during TAC divided by the sow inventory. Regarding the effect of biosecurity measures during PED outbreak on TAC and DP/S, longer TAC was observed in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae–positive farms and farms outsourcing pig transport to the slaughterhouse (p < 0.05). In addition, farms with divided truck entrances had lower DP/S than those without divided entrances (p < 0.05).Regarding the effect of intervention practices to control PED on TAC and DP/S, farms that performed feedback at 2 weeks or later after PED outbreak had longer TAC and higher DP/S than other farms (p < 0.05). Farms that fixed the hours staff worked in farrowing barn had lower DP/S than the other farms (p < 0.05). In conclusion, variables associated with long TAC were Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae –positive farms, farms outsourcing pig transport to the slaughterhouse, and farms performing feedback at 2 week or later after PED outbreak. Additionally, those associated with high DP/S were farms without divided entrances, farms without a fixed hours worked in the barn, and farms that performed feedback at 2 week or later after PED outbreak.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume169
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2019

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