Detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on public surfaces in a densely populated urban area of Brazil: A potential tool for monitoring the circulation of infected patients

Jônatas Santos Abrahão, Lívia Sacchetto, Izabela Maurício Rezende, Rodrigo Araújo Lima Rodrigues, Ana Paula Correia Crispim, César Moura, Diogo Correa Mendonça, Erik Reis, Fernanda Souza, Gabriela Fernanda Garcia Oliveira, Iago Domingos, Paulo Victor de Miranda Boratto, Pedro Henrique Bastos Silva, Victoria Fulgêncio Queiroz, Talita Bastos Machado, Luis Adan Flores Andrade, Karine Lima Lourenço, Thaís Silva, Graziele Pereira Oliveira, Viviane de Souza AlvesPedro Augusto Alves, Erna Geessien Kroon, Giliane de Souza Trindade, Betânia Paiva Drumond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The world is experiencing the worst global health crisis in recent decades since December/2019 due to a new pandemic coronavirus. The COVID-19 disease, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has resulted in more than 30 million cases and 950 thousand deaths worldwide as of September 21, 2020. Determining the extent of the virus on public surfaces is critical for understanding the potential risk of infection in these areas. In this study, we investigated the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on public surfaces in a densely populated urban area in Brazil. Forty-nine of 933 samples tested positive (5.25%) for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, including samples collected from distinct material surfaces, including metal and concrete, and distinct places, mainly around hospital care units and public squares. Our data indicated the contamination of public surfaces by SARS-CoV-2, suggesting the circulation of infected patients and the risk of infection for the population. Constant monitoring of the virus in urban areas is required as a strategy to fight the pandemic and prevent further infections.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume766
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Apr 2021

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